Heat’s Kelly Olynyk weighs in on bizarre ending to Game 1 of Finals

Miami’s Kelly Olynyk reacts during at game against Boston this past season. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Miami Heat big man Kelly Olynyk is half a world away, in India, and did not have a chance to watch Game 1 of the NBA Finals.

But Olynyk, who is at the NBA Academy India in the National Capital Territory of Delhi to serve as coaches for Basketball Without Borders Asia, knows how one of the more bizarre Finals games ended Thursday with controversial plays at the end of regulation and overtime of the Warriors’ 124-114 victory over the Cavaliers.

Olynyk, talking with Heat writers on a conference call, was asked about Cleveland’s JR Smith forgetting the score at the end of regulation and dribbling out the clock with the game tied and the Cavs’ Tristian Thompson taking offense to Golden State’s Shaun Livingston taking a shot in the final seconds of overtime instead of holding onto the ball and being called for a shot-clock violation.

Olynyk, a five-year veteran who spent his first four seasons in Boston, said it’s not that unusual for somebody to lose track of the score.

“I feel like I’ve forgotten the score before,” he said. “You’re down one and you think you’re up one. Then you realize it and it’s too late. That happens all the time. It’s human. Everybody is a human.”

But Smith happened to do it at the most crucial time on the biggest stage after rebounding teammate George Hill’s missed free throw with less than five seconds remaining with the score tied at 107, and dribbling to halfcourt before realizing the situation.

Smith tried to say he knew the score and was looking for an opening for a shot. But Cleveland coach Tyronn Lue said that Smith thought the Cavaliers were leading.

Olynyk said the only thing a team can do is move on and get ready for overtime, something the Cavaliers did not do very well being outscored by 10 points.

“It’s in the past,” Olynyk said. “You’ve got to strap up and play overtime. There’s not much else you can do. You have five more minutes to win a basketball game.”

As for the final seconds of overtime and Thompson being called for a Flagrant 2 foul and being ejected, Olynyk said it does not matter to him if a team tries to score late in a game that is decided. He referenced the Heat’s Game 2 playoff win over Philadelphia when some of the  Sixers were not happy that Heat guard Goran Dragic dribbled down the court for an uncontested layup with 1.2 seconds remaining in Miami’s 113-103 victory.

“Obviously it depends on where you’re playing and what you’re playing for,” Olynyk said. “If you’re playing in FIBA, points for and against count. So you have to do that. That’s been Goran’s approach his whole life. That’s part of basketball in the international game. Points for and against, sometimes tiebreakers come down to that.

“In the NBA it’s a little different. It’s kind of like a sportsmanship thing. It’s something you do that you run out the clock. I don’t really think it makes a difference personally. Whether you lose by 17 or 20 or whether you win by eight or win by nine or whether you have 12 turnovers or 13 turnovers. It’s not affecting the outcome of the game. It doesn’t really matter to me. It doesn’t really make a difference to me. It doesn’t make a difference in the outcome of the game, win and loss record. If a guy wants two more points we’ll give it to him and move onto Game (2).”

The Warriors said it’s their philosophy never to take a turnover.

“It’s habit,” Olynyk said. “They don’t want any habit that leads to a turnover. I guess that’s whatever. … their prerogative.”

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NBA Finals: JR Smith’s blunder costs LeBron, Cavaliers chance to steal Game 1 from Warriors

Cleveland’s LeBron James looks at JR Smith as time expires in regulation against the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 of the 2018 NBA Finals with the score tied at 107. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

The Cleveland Cavaliers – the biggest underdogs in the Finals in 30 years – squandered a golden opportunity to steal Game 1 and now must be wondering just what they have to do to win a game against the Golden State Warriors.

In the final minute of regulation, the Cavaliers were victimized by a little-known rule that allowed the officials to change a call and then watched JR Smith dribble out what could have been their only chance at a win.

Smith rebounded a missed George Hill free throw with 4.7 seconds to play in regulation and thinking the Cavs had the lead raced to halfcourt with the ball. The problem was the game was tied and Smith’s brain cramp send the game into overtime where the Warriors dominated for a 124-114 win.

Although Smith tried to save himself by saying he knew the game was tied and he was trying to find room to get a shot and then thought Cleveland going to call a time out, he clearly believed the Cavs had the lead.

Cavs coach Tryonn Lue confirmed that.

“He thought it was over,” Lue said. “He thought we were up one.”

The look on LeBron James’ face told the story. James finished with 51 points and must have been wondering if his effort was going to go to waste.

It did.

Smith’s mental meltdown concluded a bizarre final minute filled with drama and breakdowns.

It all started with a reversal on a block-charge call with 34.6 seconds to play that had a huge impact on the outcome. Kevin Durant was originally called for an offensive foul but because the officials could review the play to see if James was in the restricted circle, the actual call was also able to be reviewed. It was changed – correctly – to a block on James.

Instead of the Cavs leading 104-102 with the ball, Durant made both free throws and the game was tied.

“For our team to come out and play their hearts out, compete the way we did, it’s bad,” Lue said about the overturned call.

Fast forward to the final seconds with the Warriors leading 107-106 thanks to a Stephen Curry basket and free throw. The Warriors fell asleep on the biggest possession of the game and Klay Thompson had to grab Hill, who was cutting to the basket and would have been wide open as James was making the pass. Hill made the first free throw to tie the score and missed the second, setting up Smith’s blunder.

All of which must have James wondering: “What more can I do?”

James had the sixth 50-point game in NBA Finals history. He also tied Michael Jordan with his 109th playoff game with at least 30 points. James shot 19 of 32, had eight rebounds and eight assists and still could not will his team to a win.

In addition, the Cavaliers finished with a 52-38 rebounding advantage and the Warriors were just 8 of 30 on 3-pointers midway through the fourth quarter. They finished 13 of 36.

While Lue said the  Cavs were robbed, Warriors coach Steve Kerr said his team was lucky.

“We played as well as we’ve played all postseason,” James said. “We gave ourselves a chance possession after possession after possession. And there were some plays that were kind of taken away from us.”

Cleveland’s Tristan Thompson confronts Golden State’s Draymond Green late in Game 1. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Let’s get physical: With the Cavaliers’ frustration level already boiling over, tempers flared in the final seconds of overtime and it could impact Sunday’s Game 2. After James had words with Curry and Thompson, Cleveland’s Tristian Thompson took offense to Shaun Livingston taking a shot with four seconds remaining and threw an elbow at Livingston.

Thompson said the thought Livingston should not have shot the ball and taken the shot clock violation. “That was some bull****,” he said.

Livingston, and the rest of the Warriors, disagreed.

“We don’t ever take a turnover,” Livingston said. “We finish the game out, that’s just how we play. That’s not disrespect to any team.”

Thompson was immediately ejected and as the teams came together Golden State’s Draymond Green started talking and waiving goodbye. Thompson shoved the basketball and his hand in Green’s face. Green backed off.

The league certainly will take a look at the play today and could fine or even suspend Tristian Thompson for a game.

Klay Thompson is in pain after injuring his left knee. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Warriors let out sigh of relief: As much as we all believe this will be a quick series the first quarter reminded us how quickly things could change.

Everybody connected to the Warriors held their breath when Smith slipped and rolled into Klay Thompson’s left knee about six minutes into the game. The Warriors guard went down grimacing and slapped the court, a bad sign. But the news was as good as it could have been for the Warriors as Thompson was diagnosed with a leg contusion and returned at the start of the second quarter. He finished with 24 points.

But the play illustrates why nothing is guaranteed. This could easily have ended differently and suddenly the Warriors are down one of their stars and the series takes on a whole different look.

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