Heat don’t have a pick this year, but they will be well-represented at this week’s NBA draft combine

Miami Heat President Pat Riley talks with the media at a season-end press conference on Monday, April 30, 2018 at American Airlines Arena in Miami, Fla. (Charles Trainor III/Miami Herald/TNS)

The Heat don’t have a pick in this year’s June 21 draft, but they will be well-represented at this week’s NBA combine.

A group that includes president Pat Riley, general manager Andy Elisburg, vice president of player personnel Chet Kammerer, coach Erik Spoelstra, and members of the player personnel staff will represent the Heat at the league’s draft combine held in Chicago at the Quest Multisport complex. The event started Wednesday and ends Sunday, with 69 players invited and expected to participate in the testing and interviews.

Teams are allowed to interview up to 20 prospects at the combine this week, with each session lasting no longer than 30 minutes each. Without a pick this year, the Heat are expected to focus on players who are projected to be taken in the second round but also could end up in the undrafted pile.

The big names expected to be at the combine include Duke’s Marvin Bagley III, Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson Jr., Missouri’s Michael Porter Jr. and Oklahoma’s Trae Young. Top prospects DeAndre Ayton from Arizona and Luka Doncic from Slovenia will be no shows.

Miami’s Bruce Brown Jr. and Lonnie Walker are the only two in-state players who are listed as participants for this week’s combine.

With the combine underway, here’s a look at the Heat’s upcoming draft picks (with many of them going to other teams) …

2018 first round: The No. 16 selection is the first of two first-round picks owed to the Phoenix Suns as part of the 2015 acquisition of Goran Dragic. An unprotected 2021 first-round pick is also due to the Suns.

2018 second round: The No. 46 selection belongs to the Houston Rockets, which received it from the Memphis Grizzles, which acquired the pick and center Chris Andersen from the Heat in 2016. The move helped reduce Miami’s luxury tax burden.

2019 first round: The Heat own their 2019 first-round pick, but they are unable to trade it until after the 2018 draft because the NBA doesn’t allow teams to be without consecutive future first-round picks.

2019 second round: This pick belongs to the Minnesota Timberwolves, which received it from the Charlotte Hornets, which acquired the selection when the Heat traded it to move up two slots in the 2014 draft in order to take Shabazz Napier at No. 24.

2020 first round: The Heat own their 2020 first-round pick, but they are unable to trade it with their 2021 first-round selection going to the Suns. The NBA doesn’t allow teams to be without consecutive future first-round picks.

2020 second round: This pick belongs to the Sacramento Kings, which received it from the Cleveland Cavaliers, which received it from the Boston Celtics, which acquired the selection and guard Zoran Dragic from the Heat in 2015.

2021 first round: This unprotected selection is the second of two-first round picks owed to the Phoenix Suns as part of the 2015 acquisition of Goran Dragic. The Heat’s No. 16 pick this year also belongs to the Suns.

2021 second round: This pick belongs to the Portland Trail Blazers, which acquired the selection and Brian Roberts from the Heat in 2016.

2022 first round: The Heat own their 2022 first-round pick, but they are unable to trade it with their 2021 first-round selection going to the Suns. The NBA doesn’t allow teams to be without consecutive future first-round picks.

2022 second round: The Heat own their 2022 second-round pick, and they can trade it at any time.

2023 first round: The Heat own their 2023 first-round pick, and they can trade it at any time.

2023 second round: This pick belongs to the Dallas Mavericks, which acquired the selection as part of the Heat’s salary-cap dump of the contract of Josh McRoberts in 2017.

2024 first round: The Heat own their 2024 first-round pick, and they can trade it at any time.

2024 second round: This pick could belong to the Cleveland Cavaliers, which acquired the selection as part of the trade that brought Dwyane Wade back to the Heat in February. But the pick will only go to the Cavaliers if it’s between Nos. 56-60.

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