Ray Allen made biggest shot in Heat history and now is a Hall of Fame finalist; Tim Hardaway not on list  

Ray Allen of the Miami Heat makes a game-tying three-pointer over Tony Parker of the San Antonio Spurs during Game Six of the 2013 NBA Finals at AmericanAirlines Arena on June 18, 2013 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

LOS ANGELES – When Ray Allen joined the Miami Heat his best years were behind him. But not his best shot.

Allen, who has the most dramatic shot in Heat history, was named one 13 finalists for the Basketball Hall of Fame class of 2018 on Saturday.

Allen is one six first-time finalists along with former NBA stars Grant Hill, Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, Olympic gold medalist Katie Smith and four-time WNBA champion Tina Thompson.

Maurice Cheeks, Rudy Tomjanovich and Chris Weber return as finalists along with college coaches Lefty Driesell and Kim Mulkey, referee Hugh Evans and the 10-time AAU National Champions Wayland Baptist University.

Former Heat guard, a three-time finalist, Tim Hardaway, did not make the list this year.

Allen played 18 seasons, his final two with the Heat. He signed as a free agent in 2012 and helped the team win the 2013 title thanks to the biggest shot of his career. With the Heat seconds away from losing the Finals to the San Antonio Spurs, Allen made a corner 3-pointer with 5.2 seconds remaining in Game 6. The shot tied the game, the Heat won in overtime and then took Game 7 to capture their second consecutive title.

Allen, who now makes his home in Miami, also won a title with the Celtics in 2008. He was a 10-time All-Star, remains the NBA career leader in 3-point field goals with 2,973 and is sixth on the all-time free throw list percentage list at .894.

The fifth overall pick of the 1996 draft by Minnesota out of Connecticut, Allen was traded to the Bucks on draft night. He then spent 6.5 years with Milwaukee, 4.5 years in Seattle and five years in Boston.

Allen averaged 18.9 points in his career while shooting 45.2 percent, 40 percent on threes. In two years with the Heat he averaged 10.3 points.

At Connecticut, Allen was a unanimous first-team All-American in 1996. He was named the USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year in 1995 and won an Olympic gold medal in 2000.

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